A History of Central Banking & the Enslavement of Mankind

$25.00

By Stephen Mitford Goodson. This volume focuses upon the role of banking and money in history from ancient times to the present. The role of moneylenders in history has been called the “hidden hand.” It is the power to create, lend and accumulate interest on “credit,” and then re-lend that interest for further interest, in perpetuity. Somehow, however, the moneylenders have persuaded governments that banking is best left to private interests. Wars, revolutions, depressions, recessions and social upheavals have been directly related to the efforts of these moneylenders to retain and extend their power and profits. When anything has threatened their scam, they respond with war and revolution. The progress of a civilization relates to the degree by which it is free from the influence of debt, and the degradation that results when the moneylenders are permitted to take power. Goodson shows that both world wars, the Napoleonic Wars, the American Revolution, the rise and fall of Caesar, the overthrow of Qaddafi and the revolution against Nicholas II all relate to this “hidden hand.” This is the key to understanding the past, present and future. Softcover, 226 pages, #783.

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    By Stephen Mitford Goodson. This volume focuses upon the role of banking and money in history from ancient times to the present. The role of moneylenders in history has been called the “hidden hand.” It is the power to create, lend and accumulate interest on “credit,” and then re-lend that interest for further interest, in perpetuity.

    Somehow, however, the moneylenders have persuaded governments that banking is best left to private interests. Wars, revolutions, depressions, recessions and social upheavals have been directly related to the efforts of these moneylenders to retain and extend their power and profits. When anything has threatened their scam, they respond with war and revolution.

    The progress of a civilization relates to the degree by which it is free from the influence of debt, and the degradation that results when the moneylenders are permitted to take power. Goodson shows that both world wars, the Napoleonic Wars, the American Revolution, the rise and fall of Caesar, the overthrow of Qaddafi and the revolution against Nicholas II all relate to this “hidden hand.” This is the key to understanding the past, present and future.

    Softcover, 226 pages, #783.

    About the Author

    Stephen Mitford Goodson is a White South African monetary reform campaigner, investment consultant, and author of British extraction. Goodson is the leader of the Abolition of Income Tax and Usury Party. From 2003 to 2012, Goodson served as a director of the South African Reserve Bank.

    Review

    Central Banking & Human Bondage: The Works of Stephen Mitford Goodson

    Immediately the perceptive reader will be aware of several promising features of these books: The author’s middle name is Mitford, indicating the likelihood of a propensity towards rebelliousness. Next, the author’s dedication of A History of Central Banking to Knut Hamsun, “a beacon of light and hope of the natural world order;” the great Norwegian novelist being a man of honor who refused to bow before Talmudic vengeance upon the defeated of World War II. The next promising feature is a quote from Ezra Pound (a figure akin to Hamsun for his having fought the same malignant forces, defending the same heroic ideals, and having undergone great persecutions in the post-war era) which sets the tone for the book: “And you will never understand American history or the history of the Occident during the past 2000 years unless you look at one or two problems; namely, sheenies and usury. One or the other, or both. I should say both.”

    Stephen Mitford Goodson

    Stephen Mitford Goodson

    Another interesting feature that immediately faces the reader is that the lengthy preface is written by Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi, Member of Parliament and long-time leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party. While Prince Buthelezi begins by stating that he “does not endorse the viewpoints” expressed in the book, he also points out that the book is “controversial” and will “engender strong reaction.” The remarks of caution by Buthelezi are presumably necessitated by Goodson, like his Mitford relatives, insisting on documenting certain heresies pertaining to the influence of Jews on politics and finance, and on the achievements of Axis states in overthrowing shylockcracy.

    Despite opening with that qualification, Buthelezi nonetheless proceeds to support Goodson’s views on central baking and usury as the main cause of “profound and inhumane differences” within nations throughout the world. Buthelezi declares himself an enemy of that system: “For this reason, for several years, my Party and I have argued that South Africa should reform its central banking and monetary system, even if that means placing our country out of step with iniquitous world standards.” Since that is the case, one suspects that Buthelezi also realizes that the resistance of the Axis states to just this system might have been the real cause of their placing themselves “out of step with iniquitous world standards,” which Goodson subsequently explains. The prince writes: “This work provides not only a broad sweep of the history of economics over almost three millennia, but insights into how the problems of usury have been confounding and enslaving mankind since civilized existence first began.”

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    Weight 1.00 lbs