Stroke of Luck Saves Europe

By Peter Strahl. For centuries, the Poles have celebrated April 9, 1241 as a day of great victory over the Golden Horde of the Mongols (called at that time “Tartars” or “Tatars”) near Liegnitz—a day that turned back forever the threat of Central Asian conquest.

Liegnitz1But was it really so? TBR looks at how Europeans ironically snatched “victory” from the jaws of defeat. [Read the entire article as PDF…]


Taken from

The Barnes Review, July/August 2012: The Day Europe Almost Fell

VOLUME XVIII, NUMBER 4


Posted in: TBR Articles and tagged: ,

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