Atlantis in the Caribbean

$20.00

Disproving many well-known Atlantis theories and providing a new growing hypothesis, Andrew Collins shows that what Plato recounts is the memory of a major ice-age cataclysm 13,000 years ago, when a comet devastated the island of Cuba and submerged part of the Bahamian landmass in the Caribbean. He parallels Plato’s account with corroborating ancient myths and legends from the indigenous people of North and South America, such as the Maya, the Quiché, the Yuchi of Oklahoma, the islanders of the Antilles, and the native peoples of Brazil. The author explains how the comet that destroyed Atlantis in the Caribbean was the same comet that formed the “Carolina Bays” across the mid-Atlantic. He reveals evidence of sunken ruins, ancient complexes spanning more than 10 acres that clearly suggest urban development and meticulously planned road systems. Collins argues that Plato’s story was first carried back to the Mediterranean world by the Phoenicians and Carthaginians as early as the first millennium B.C. He offers additional ancient trans-Atlantic trade evidence. Softcover, 528 pages, two eight-page B&W inserts and 19 B&W illustrations, #784.

50 in stock (can be backordered)

  • Description

    Disproving many well-known Atlantis theories and providing a new growing hypothesis, Andrew Collins shows that what Plato recounts is the memory of a major ice-age cataclysm 13,000 years ago, when a comet devastated the island of Cuba and submerged part of the Bahamian landmass in the Caribbean. He parallels Plato’s account with corroborating ancient myths and legends from the indigenous people of North and South America, such as the Maya, the Quiché, the Yuchi of Oklahoma, the islanders of the Antilles, and the native peoples of Brazil. The author explains how the comet that destroyed Atlantis in the Caribbean was the same comet that formed the “Carolina Bays” across the mid-Atlantic. He reveals evidence of sunken ruins, ancient complexes spanning more than 10 acres that clearly suggest urban development and meticulously planned road systems. Collins argues that Plato’s story was first carried back to the Mediterranean world by the Phoenicians and Carthaginians as early as the first millennium B.C. He offers additional ancient trans-Atlantic trade evidence. Softcover, 528 pages, two eight-page B&W inserts and 19 B&W illustrations, #784.

  • Additional information

    Weight 1.00 lbs