The Tragedy of Rudolf Hess

The Tragedy of Rudolf Hess

By M. Raphael Johnson. The life of Rudolf Hess constitutes one of the glaring examples of myth within the study of World War II and beyond. In the orgy of demonization that brought on and sustained World War I and its aftermath, Rudolf Hess’s memory needed to be effaced from the earth. His mission to Britain for peace, according to the Nuremberg Trials, was a “war crime” for which Hess needed to be punished.

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The Dual Nature of the Byzantine Empire

The Dual Nature of the Byzantine Empire

By Edward T. May. When considering vast events such as the fall of the western Roman empire, the linkage of specific events with exact dates is a dicey proposition at best. One cannot say, for example, that the empire began its demise in a certain year, or that its absolute collapse occurred on such-and-such a day.

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Concentration Camp Money

Concentration Camp Money

By Jennifer A. White. Far from being the “death camps” as you have heard so often, places like Auschwitz, Dachau and Buchenwald were not in the business of extermination. They were work camps, critical to the German war effort. But did you know that the Jewish workers were compensated for their labor with scrip printed specifically for their use in stores, canteens and even brothels?

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Narcotics East and West—In Colonial and Modern Asia

Narcotics East and West—In Colonial and Modern Asia

By George Fowler. Regarding Asia, the post-World War II West has endured decades of self-flagellation within its literature, theater, media and written history. This month Hong Kong reverts to the often untender mercies of Red China. With China’s communist government an increasingly cryptic relic of an expired era, that country’s future dealings with the West may be strongly influenced by what it claims happened in lands where incredible wealth was never far from dire poverty.

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Who Ordered the Death of French Admiral Darlan?

Who Ordered the Death of French Admiral Darlan?

By Alec de Montmorency. The “one man, one gun, no conspiracy” explanation of assassinations, used in the murders of President John F. Kennedy and Martin L. King, was nothing new. It was employed in the assassination of a leading French nationalist in Algeria during World War II. Following are the reminiscences of a journalist who knew Adm. Jean François Darlan and who questions the circumstances of his death.

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A Titanic Hero: Senator William Alden Smith

A Titanic Hero: Senator William Alden Smith

By Michael Collins Piper. Once again the saga of the ill-fated Titanic has captured the media’s imagination. Here’s some history that’s been virtually forgotten—the story of a populist law maker who never set foot on the ship yet became an un-sung hero of one of the most famous maritime disasters in history.

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Britain’s Balfour Declaration of 1917

Britain’s Balfour Declaration of 1917

By Robert John. Eighty years ago, the British government—through international bankers—brokered away the land and the future of the people of Palestine in order to create a national home for the Jewish people. The president and Congress of the United States underwrote the World War I deal, which would cost Britain mightily and which continues to cost American taxpayers well over $4 billion dollars each year. But in terms of what it will cost in the future, in terms of both U.S. treasure and blood, is incalculable.

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