The Barnes Review September/October 2014

The September/October issue of our bi-monthly magazine The Barnes Review, “World War I: Special TBR Centenary Issue” is about to go into the mail. You can look at its Cover and Table of Contents online. We have also posted its lead article “WWI: How Europe Nearly Devoured Itself” by Marc Roland.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/1016

AD 69: Emperors, Armies & Anarchy

With the death of Nero by his own shaky hand, the ill-sorted, ill-starred Julio-Claudian dynasty came to an ignominious end, and Rome was up for the taking. This was June 9, A.D. 68. The following year, commonly known as “the year of the four emperors,” was one of Rome’s worst.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/1012

The Lost Colony of the Templars: Verrazano’s Secret Mission to America

In 1524 the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazano was sent by French King Francis I on an expedition ostensibly to find a shorter route to China. However, his true mission, author Steven Sora suggests, was to contact a Templar colony that might have been established in what is now Newport, Rhode Island, by Henry Sinclair at the end of the 14th century.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/1009

Forgotten Civilization: The Role of Solar Outbursts on Our Past and Future

Building upon his revolutionary theory that the Sphinx dates back much further than 2500 B.C., geologist Robert Schoch reveals scientific evidence of an advanced civilization predating ancient Egypt, Sumeria and Greece, as well as the catastrophe he believes destroyed it 12,000 years ago.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/1006

The Spoils of World War II: The American Military’s Role in Stealing Europe’s Treasures

More than 50 years of research and documentation have finally revealed the extent to which the German forces acquired artworks from the lands they occupied and portrays the American military forces as both liberators . . . and plunderers themselves.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/1003

The Kaiser’s Pirates: Hunting Germany’s Raiding Cruisers 1914-1915

This is a dramatic and little-known story of the First World War, when the actions of a few bold men shaped the fate of nations. By 1914 Germany had ships and sailors scattered across the globe, protecting its overseas colonies and showing the flag of its new Imperial Navy. After war broke out, there was no hope that they could reach home. Instead, they were ordered to attack Britain’s vital trade routes for as long as possible.

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Permanent link to this article: http://barnesreview.org/wp/archives/999

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