Everything You Were Taught About American Slavery

Everything You Were Taught About American Slavery

$29.00

If you’re new to authentic Southern history or you’re just fed up with the mountain of lies, slander, disinformation and pro-North propaganda found in South-bashing history books, Everything You Were Taught about American Slavery is Wrong, Ask a Southerner will be a joyful revelation.

  • Product Description

    everything-slavery-colorEverything You Were Taught About American Slavery Is Wrong, Ask a Southerner!

    If you’re new to authentic Southern history or you’re just fed up with the mountain of lies, slander, disinformation and pro-North propaganda found in South-bashing history books, Everything You Were Taught about American Slavery is Wrong, Ask a Southerner will be a joyful revelation.

    This important 1,000-page work by award-winning Southern historian Lochlainn Seabrook decimates the deceitful view of slavery annually churned out by Yankee mythologists. Lavishly illustrated with over 500 intriguing images, a helpful “world slavery time line” and a detailed index of significant historical figures, Seabrook lays out the truth:

    •  Africans were enslaving their own people thousands of years before the transatlantic slave trade and were willing partners in the acquisition of slaves for the West;
    • White American slavery laid the foundation for Black American slavery;
    • Africans and Arabs enslaved 1.5 million Whites in the 1700s;
    • Genuine slavery was never practiced in the American South and both the American slave trade and slavery got their start in the North;
    • The American abolition movement began in the South and five times more Blacks fought for the Confederacy than for the Union;
    • There were thousands of African-American and American Indian slave owners in early America but less than 5% of White Southerners ever owned slaves;
    • The Emancipation Proclamation did not free a single slave—and was not meant to. Until the last day of his life, Abe Lincoln campaigned to have all Blacks deported to Africa. . . .

    In support of his in-depth research, the author provides hundreds of eyewitness accounts—dating from the 1600s to the early 20th century—firsthand testimony clearly illustrating how American slavery came to be, how it was actually practiced, and how both European Americans and African Americans viewed it and experienced it.

    With 21 chapters, nearly 3,500 endnotes, and a comprehensive 2,000 book bibliography, this well investigated work—the result of over 20 years of research—is a must-read for every serious student of American history, Southern history and American slavery. The foreword is by highly respected Black American educator Barbara G. Marthal.

    Softcover, 1,020 pages